Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
J Affect Disord. 2007 Aug;101(1-3):211-7. Epub 2007 Jan 23.

Alcoholism and anxiety in bipolar illness: differential lifetime anxiety comorbidity in bipolar I women with and without alcoholism.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, United States.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

This study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence rate of anxiety comorbidity in bipolar subjects with and without alcohol use disorders (AUD).

METHODS:

Bipolar men and women who entered the Stanley Foundation Bipolar Network (SFBN) underwent a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-IV) and were divided into those subjects meeting current or lifetime criteria for an alcohol use disorder (AUD=213) vs. those subjects who did not (non-AUD=137). Lifetime rates of comorbid anxiety disorder were evaluated between groups.

RESULTS:

Of 350 subjects, 163 (46.5%) met criteria for an anxiety disorder. Panic disorder and OCD were the most common anxiety disorders in the AUD and non-AUD groups. OCD and specific phobia were significantly less prevalent in BP I patients with AUD compared to those without. Bipolar women with AUD had a significantly higher rate of PTSD than those without.

CONCLUSION:

These data highlight the added liability of anxiety comorbidity in BP disorder. Specifically, the greater amount of PTSD and lesser amount of OCD in bipolar women with alcohol comorbidity may have important diagnostic and treatment implications beyond dual diagnosis. Further study in comorbidity patterns is encouraged to not only better understand illness burden, but to maximize pattern-specific treatment outcomes.

PMID:
17254638
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk