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Phys Ther. 2007 Feb;87(2):153-63. Epub 2007 Jan 23.

Trunk muscle activation patterns, lumbar compressive forces, and spine stability when using the bodyblade.

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  • 1Department of Kinesiology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

The objective of this study was to analyze the trunk muscle activation patterns, spine kinematics, and lumbar compressive forces that occur when using the Bodyblade, a popular tool in physical medicine clinics.

SUBJECTS:

The participants were 14 male subjects who were healthy and who were recruited from a university population.

METHODS:

With data collected from surface electromyography of selected trunk and shoulder muscles, video analysis, and a 3-dimensional lumbar spine position sensor, modeling methods were used to quantify L4-5 compressive forces and spine stability.

RESULTS:

Large-amplitude oscillation of a vertically oriented Bodyblade resulted in the greatest activation levels of the internal oblique and external oblique muscles (average amplitude=48% and 26% of maximal voluntary isometric contraction, respectively), which were associated with L4-5 compressive forces as high as 4,328 N. Instantaneous stability increased with well-coordinated effort, muscle activation, and compression, but decreased when subjects had poor technique.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION:

The way the Bodyblade is used may either enhance or compromise spine stability. Associated lumbar compressive forces may be inappropriate for some people with compression-intolerant lumbar spine pathology.

PMID:
17244696
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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