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J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2006 Nov;17(4):698-715.

The Tuskegee Legacy Project: willingness of minorities to participate in biomedical research.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry, New York, USA. ralph.katz@nyu.edu

Abstract

The broad goal of the Tuskegee Legacy Project (TLP) study was to address, and understand, a range of issues related to the recruitment and retention of Blacks and other minorities in biomedical research studies. The specific aim of this analysis was to compare the self-reported willingness of Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites to participate as research subjects in biomedical studies, as measured by the Likelihood of Participation (LOP) Scale and the Guinea Pig Fear Factor (GPFF) Scale. The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire, a 60 item instrument, was administered to 1,133 adult Blacks, Hispanics, and non-Hispanic Whites in 4 U.S. cities. The findings revealed no difference in self-reported willingness to participate in biomedical research, as measured by the LOP Scale, between Blacks, Hispanics, and Whites, despite Blacks being 1.8 times as likely as Whites to have a higher fear of participation in biomedical research on the GPFF Scale.

PMID:
17242525
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1780164
Free PMC Article

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