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Am J Prev Med. 2007 Mar;32(3):217-23. Epub 2007 Jan 22.

Promoting healthy eating and physical activity short-term effects of a mass media campaign.

Author information

  • 1Department of Community Health Sciences, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA. beaudoin@tulane.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Soaring obesity levels present a severe health risk in the United States, especially in low-income minority populations.

INTERVENTION:

High-frequency paid television and radio advertising, as well as bus and streetcar signage.

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS:

A mass media campaign in New Orleans to promote walking and fruit and vegetable consumption in a low-income, predominantly African-American urban population. Messages tailored with consideration of the African-American majority.

DESIGN:

Random-digit-dial telephone surveys using cross-sectional representative samples at baseline in 2004 and following the onset of the campaign in 2005.

MEASURES:

Survey items on campaign message recall; attitudes toward walking, snack food avoidance, and fruit and vegetable consumption; and behaviors related to fruit and vegetable consumption, snack food consumption, and utilitarian and leisure walking.

RESULTS:

From baseline, there were significant increases in message recall measures, positive attitudes toward fruit and vegetable consumption, and positive attitudes toward walking. Behaviors did not change significantly. In 2005, message recall measures were associated with positive levels of each of the outcome variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

Over 5 months, the media campaign appeared to have stimulated improvements in attitudes toward healthy diet and walking behaviors addressed by the campaign. These findings encourage the continuation of the media campaign, with future evaluation to consider whether the behavioral measures change.

PMID:
17236742
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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