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Am J Hum Genet. 2007 Feb;80(2):232-40. Epub 2006 Dec 21.

Complex inheritance pattern resembling autosomal recessive inheritance involving a microdeletion in thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome.

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  • 1Institut für Medizinische Genetik, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

Thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is characterized by hypomegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and bilateral radial aplasia in the presence of both thumbs. Other frequent associations are congenital heart disease and a high incidence of cow's milk intolerance. Evidence for autosomal recessive inheritance comes from families with several affected individuals born to unaffected parents, but several other observations argue for a more complex pattern of inheritance. In this study, we describe a common interstitial microdeletion of 200 kb on chromosome 1q21.1 in all 30 investigated patients with TAR syndrome, detected by microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization. Analysis of the parents revealed that this deletion occurred de novo in 25% of affected individuals. Intriguingly, inheritance of the deletion along the maternal line as well as the paternal line was observed. The absence of this deletion in a cohort of control individuals argues for a specific role played by the microdeletion in the pathogenesis of TAR syndrome. We hypothesize that TAR syndrome is associated with a deletion on chromosome 1q21.1 but that the phenotype develops only in the presence of an additional as-yet-unknown modifier (mTAR).

PMID:
17236129
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1785342
Free PMC Article

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