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J Urol. 2007 Feb;177(2):493-8.

Relationship between body mass index and prostate cancer screening in the United States.

Author information

  • 1Duke Prostate Center, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Obesity is associated with more advanced disease and worse outcomes in men with prostate cancer. To our knowledge the relationship between obesity and prostate cancer screening behavior in men 40 or older is unknown. Thus, we examined associations between body mass index and prostate cancer screening behavior.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We used the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to study prostate cancer screening in a representative sample of 57,827 men 40 years or older. Primary outcomes were the proportion of men ever screened and the proportion screened in the last year for prostate cancer.

RESULTS:

Obese men were more likely than normal weight men to have had a prostate specific antigen test (62.1% vs 56.1%, p <0.001) and to have had a prostate specific antigen test in the last year (44.2% vs 38.2%, p <0.001). After controlling for sociodemographic characteristics obese men remained more likely than normal weight men to have had a prostate specific antigen test (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.33-1.61) and to have had a prostate specific antigen test in the last year (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.30-1.55). Respondents reporting an ongoing relationship with a physician (OR 2.88, 95% CI 2.57-3.22) and black nonHispanic men vs white men (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.38-1.81) were also more likely to have had a prostate specific antigen test in the last year.

CONCLUSIONS:

Obese men are more likely than normal weight men to be screened for prostate cancer. Associations between advanced stage, worse outcomes and obesity may not be explained by disparities in the screening of obese men for prostate cancer.

PMID:
17222617
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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