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Biol Psychiatry. 2007 Sep 15;62(6):642-51. Epub 2007 Jan 9.

Neural substrates of resisting craving during cigarette cue exposure.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California-Los Angeles, 300 UCLA Medical Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. abrody@ucla.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In cigarette smokers, the most commonly reported areas of brain activation during visual cigarette cue exposure are the prefrontal, anterior cingulate, and visual cortices. We sought to determine changes in brain activity in response to cigarette cues when smokers actively resist craving.

METHODS:

Forty-two tobacco-dependent smokers underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging, during which they were presented with videotaped cues. Three cue presentation conditions were tested: cigarette cues with subjects allowing themselves to crave (cigarette cue crave), cigarette cues with the instruction to resist craving (cigarette cue resist), and matched neutral cues.

RESULTS:

Activation was found in the cigarette cue resist (compared with the cigarette cue crave) condition in the left dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and precuneus. Lower magnetic resonance signal for the cigarette cue resist condition was found in the cuneus bilaterally, left lateral occipital gyrus, and right postcentral gyrus. These relative activations and deactivations were more robust when the cigarette cue resist condition was compared with the neutral cue condition.

CONCLUSIONS:

Suppressing craving during cigarette cue exposure involves activation of limbic (and related) brain regions and deactivation of primary sensory and motor cortices.

PMID:
17217932
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1992815
Free PMC Article

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