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Diabetologia. 2007 Mar;50(3):555-62. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Adiponectin receptor genes: mutation screening in syndromes of insulin resistance and association studies for type 2 diabetes and metabolic traits in UK populations.

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  • 1Metabolic Disease Group, The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, The Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, CB10 1SA, UK.

Abstract

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS:

Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitising and anti-atherogenic properties. Several reports suggest that genetic variants in the adiponectin gene are associated with circulating levels of adiponectin, insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes risk. Recently two receptors for adiponectin have been cloned. Genetic studies have yielded conflicting results on the role of these genes and type 2 diabetes predisposition. In this study we aimed to evaluate the potential role of genetic variation in these genes in syndromes of severe insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and in related metabolic traits in UK Europid populations.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Exons and splice junctions of the adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 genes (ADIPOR1; ADIPOR2) were sequenced in patients from our severe insulin resistance cohort (n=129). Subsequently, 24 polymorphisms were tested for association with type 2 diabetes in population-based type 2 diabetes case-control studies (n=2,127) and with quantitative traits in a population-based longitudinal study (n=1,721).

RESULTS:

No missense or nonsense mutations in ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 were detected in the cohort of patients with severe insulin resistance. None of the 24 polymorphisms (allele frequency 2.3-48.3%) tested was associated with type 2 diabetes in the case-control study. Similarly, none of the polymorphisms was associated with fasting plasma insulin, fasting and 2-h post-load plasma glucose, 30-min insulin increment or BMI.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

Genetic variation in ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2 is not a major cause of extreme insulin resistance in humans, nor does it contribute in a significant manner to type 2 diabetes risk and related traits in UK Europid populations.

PMID:
17216283
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1794135
Free PMC Article
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