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Health Psychol. 2007 Jan;26(1):30-9.

A transdisciplinary model integrating genetic, physiological, and psychological correlates of voluntary exercise.

Author information

  • 1University of Colorado at Boulder, Department of Psychology, Boulder, CO 80309-0345, USA. angela.bryan@colorado.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Physical inactivity contributes to as many as 250,000 premature deaths per year (R. R. Pate et al., 1995). The authors' objective was to test a transdisciplinary model of the ways in which genetic variants, physiological factors, and psychological factors are thought to influence exercise with 64 healthy, regular exercisers.

DESIGN:

In a within-subjects design, psychological and physiological responses to exercise were compared with responses to a sedentary activity.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The authors measured affective state, perceived exertion, heart rate, and temperature change in response to moderate exercise versus sedentary activity. They also quantified genotypes on a single nucleotide polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

The data show a relation between increases in positive affective states and acute exercise behavior, as opposed to a sedentary control. The BDNF gene moderated the effect of exercise on mood, heart rate, and perceived exertion. Physiological factors were, in turn, related to mood response, and mood response was a significant correlate of motivation to exercise in the future and of current exercise behavior. The model has potential as a framework for the basic study of the genetic, physiological, and psychological processes involved with voluntary exercise and as a tool for the applied examination of tailored exercise interventions and their efficacy for different subsets of individuals.

PMID:
17209695
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1896050
Free PMC Article
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