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Turk J Gastroenterol. 2006 Dec;17(4):260-6.

Assessment of bone metabolism and mineral density in chronic viral hepatitis.

Author information

  • 1Department of Internal Medicine 3rd Section, Okmeydani Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. necatiyenice@isnet.net.tr

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

The aim of the study was to assess bone metabolism and impact of disease on bone mineral density in patients with non-cirrhotic chronic hepatitis B or C.

METHODS:

105 patients with chronic hepatitis B or C receiving antiviral agents and 60 healthy controls were included. Subgroups (n=15) were defined on the basis of age (males) or menopausal status (females). Bone mineral density; serum parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), total alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels; 24-hour urinary levels of Ca and P; and urinary telopeptide (NTX) were measured. Statistical comparisons were made between patient groups and the matched controls.

RESULTS:

Compared to controls, the average serum levels of PTH were lower and 24-hour urinary mean Ca levels and T scores were higher in chronic hepatitis B patients between 20 and 40 years of age. Men with chronic hepatitis B and aged 40 - 65 years had lower mean serum P concentrations. Postmenopausal women with chronic hepatitis B had significantly higher NTX levels. Men with chronic hepatitis C had significantly elevated levels of 24-hour mean urinary P levels. The serum 25 OH vitamin D levels were significantly higher in premenopausal women with chronic hepatitis C. Postmenopausal women with chronic hepatitis C had significantly lower serum P concentrations. Other parameters and T scores did not differ significantly between patient groups and matched controls.

CONCLUSION:

Our results suggest that chronic hepatitis B and C infections do not pose a risk for osteoporosis and low bone mineral density.

PMID:
17205403
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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