Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Sleep Med Rev. 2007 Feb;11(1):47-58. Epub 2007 Jan 2.

Potential mechanisms connecting asthma, esophageal reflux, and obesity/sleep apnea complex--a hypothetical review.

Author information

  • 1Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, Quillen College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN 37614-0622, UK. Aiman_k83@yahoo.com

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and asthma are potentially linked at several levels. The pathophysiology of these two conditions seems to overlap significantly, as airway obstruction, inflammation, obesity, and several other factors are implicated in the development of both diseases. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), cardiovascular complications, obesity itself, and the underlying inflammatory processes are all complex contributory factors that provide hypothetical links. Furthermore, a collateral rise in prevalence of both OSA and asthma has been noticed during the past few years, occurring in association with the emerging epidemic of obesity, a common risk factor for both conditions. OSA and asthma share many other risk factors as well. We propose a hypothetical OSA-asthma relationship that has implications on the diagnosis and management of patients presenting with either condition singly. Clinicians should be aware that OSA might complicate asthma management. Based on this hypothesis, we suggest that the treatment of the individual patient who experiences both asthma and OSA needs to be multidisciplinary and comprehensive. This hypothetical association of asthma and OSA, though described anecdotally, has not been systematically studied. In particular, the influence of continuous positive airway pressure therapy (for sleep apnea) on asthma outcomes (such as quality of life, steroid utilization, emergency room visits) and fatality needs to be studied further.

PMID:
17198758
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk