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J Cell Physiol. 2007 Jun;211(3):630-7.

Role of human LZIP in differential activation of the NF-kappaB pathway that is induced by CCR1-dependent chemokines.

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  • 1School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

Human leucine zipper protein (LZIP) associates with CC chemokine receptor 1 (CCR1) and this protein-protein interaction should play an important role in leukocyte cell mobility. LZIP is known to regulate leukotactin-1 (Lkn-1)-dependent cell migration without affecting the chemotactic activities of other CC chemokines that bind to CCR1. Since Lkn-1 is engaged in the transcriptional activation of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and subsequent activation of the chemoattractant ability of leukocytes, we investigated the regulatory role of LZIP in the NF-kappaB pathway that is induced by CCR1-dependent chemokines. LZIP increased NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase activity in response to Lkn-1 in HOS/CCR1 cells and THP-1 cells. However, the NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase activities induced by other CCR1-dependent chemokines were not affected by LZIP overexpression. LZIP also increased Lkn-1-induced chemotactic activity through activation of the NF-kappaB pathway, whereas LZIP did not affect either the transactivation of NF-kappaB or the chemotactic activities induced by other CCR1-dependent chemokines. Western blot analysis showed that LZIP increased the degradation of IkappaBalpha induced by Lkn-1 but not by other CCR1-dependent chemokines. Results from electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that LZIP enhanced the Lkn-1-induced DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB. These data indicate that LZIP functions as a positive regulator in the NF-kappaB activation pathway that is triggered by Lkn-1 without affecting the transcriptional activation of NF-kappaB induced by other CCR1-dependent chemokines.

PMID:
17192849
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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