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Occup Environ Med. 2007 Jun;64(6):373-9. Epub 2006 Dec 20.

Air pollution and inflammation in type 2 diabetes: a mechanism for susceptibility.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. marieo@umich.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Particulate air pollution has been associated with several adverse cardiovascular health outcomes, and people with diabetes may be especially vulnerable. One potential pathway is inflammation and endothelial dysfunction-processes in which cell adhesion molecules and inflammatory markers play important roles.

AIM:

To examine whether plasma levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) were associated with particle exposure in 92 Boston area residents with type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

Daily average ambient levels of air pollution (fine particles (PM2.5), black carbon (BC) and sulphates) were measured approximately 500 m from the patient examination site and evaluated for associations with ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and vWF. Linear regressions were fit to plasma levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and vWF, with the particulate pollutant index, apparent temperature, season, age, race, sex, glycosylated haemoglobin, cholesterol, smoking history and body mass index as predictors.

RESULTS:

Air pollutant exposure measures showed consistently positive point estimates of association with the inflammatory markers. Among participants not taking statins and those with a history of smoking, associations between PM(2.5), BC and VCAM-1 were particularly strong.

CONCLUSIONS:

These results corroborate evidence suggesting that inflammatory mechanisms may explain the increased risk of air pollution-associated cardiovascular events among those with diabetes.

PMID:
17182639
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2078522
Free PMC Article
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