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Spinal Cord. 2007 Jun;45(6):420-8. Epub 2006 Dec 19.

Condition-related coping strategies in persons with spinal cord lesion: a cross-national validation of the Spinal Cord Lesion-related Coping Strategies Questionnaire in four community samples.

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  • 1Health Care Research Unit, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Cross-sectional, questionnaire.

OBJECTIVES:

Coping strategies employed to manage the consequences of a spinal cord lesion (SCL) have been found to be distinctly related to emotional well-being. However, research and clinical implications have been hampered by the lack of cross-validated measures that are directly related to the lesion and its consequences. This study investigates the psychometric performance of the SCL-related Coping Strategies Questionnaire in four different countries.

SETTING:

Austria, Germany, Switzerland and UK.

METHODS:

The study sample comprised 355 community residing persons with SCL. Multi-trait/multi-item analysis methods and non-parametric and parametric tests were used.

RESULTS:

The Acceptance coping scale showed satisfactory psychometric qualities, whereas there were some problems in the Fighting spirit scale and greater problems in the Social reliance scale. Compared with the Swedish developmental sample, Acceptance was used more in the four study countries. Consistent with the original sample, Acceptance and Fighting spirit coping correlated with fewer signs of emotional distress, persons lesioned > or = 5 years tended to report more Acceptance than the newly lesioned and coping strategies were mainly unrelated to neurological status.

CONCLUSION:

The English and German language versions of the Acceptance coping scale were valid and reliable, whereas some translated items in the Fighting spirit scale need to be revised. Translations of the Social reliance scale need to be thoroughly revised and retested. The results add further evidence to the literature on the stability of the link between adapting life priorities (ie Acceptance) and emotional well-being.

PMID:
17179976
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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