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Curr Biol. 2006 Dec 19;16(24):2466-72.

RhoE is a pro-survival p53 target gene that inhibits ROCK I-mediated apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress.

Author information

  • 1Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts 02129, USA.

Erratum in

  • Curr Biol. 2012 Nov 20;22(22):2186-7.

Abstract

The Rho family of GTPases regulates many aspects of cellular behavior through alterations to the actin cytoskeleton . The majority of the Rho family proteins function as molecular switches cycling between the active, GTP-bound and the inactive, GDP-bound conformations . Unlike typical Rho-family proteins, the Rnd subfamily members, including Rnd1, Rnd2, RhoE (also known as Rnd3), and RhoH, are GTPase deficient and are thus expected to be constitutively active . Here, we identify an unexpected role for RhoE/Rnd3 in the regulation of the p53-mediated stress response. We show that RhoE is a transcriptional p53 target gene and that genotoxic stress triggers actin depolymerization, resulting in actin-stress-fiber disassembly through p53-dependent RhoE induction. Silencing of RhoE induction in response to genotoxic stress maintains stress fiber formation and strikingly increases apoptosis, implying an antagonistic role for RhoE in p53-dependent apoptosis. We found that RhoE inhibits ROCK I (Rho-associated kinase I) activity during genotoxic stress and thereby suppresses apoptosis. We demonstrate that the p53-mediated induction of RhoE in response to DNA damage favors cell survival partly through inhibition of ROCK I-mediated apoptosis. Thus, RhoE is anticipated to function by regulating ROCK I signaling to control the balance between cell survival and cell death in response to genotoxic stress.

PMID:
17174923
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2779528
Free PMC Article

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