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Inj Prev. 2006 Dec;12 Suppl 2:ii10-ii16.

Deaths from violence in North Carolina, 2004: how deaths differ in females and males.

Author information

  • 1Injury and Violence Prevention Branch, Division of Public Health, NC Department Health and Human Services, Raleigh, NC 27699-1915, USA. kay.sanford@ncmail.net

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify gender differences in violent deaths in terms of incidence, circumstances, and methods of death.

DESIGN:

Analysis of surveillance data.

SETTING:

North Carolina, a state of 8.6 million residents on the eastern seaboard of the US.

SUBJECTS:

1674 North Carolina residents who died from violence in the state during 2004.

METHODS:

Information on violent deaths was collected by the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System using data from death certificates, medical examiner reports, and law enforcement agency incidence reports.

RESULTS:

Suicide and homicide rates were lower for females than males. For suicides, females were more likely than males to have a diagnosis of depression (55% v 36%), a current mental health problem (66% v 42%), or a history of suicide attempts (25% v 13%). Firearms were the sole method of suicide in 65% of males and 42% of females. Poisonings were more common in female than male suicides (37% v 12%). Male and female homicide victims were most likely to die from a handgun or a sharp instrument. Fifty seven percent of female homicides involved intimate partner violence, compared with 13% of male homicides. Among female homicides involving intimate partner violence, 78% occurred in the woman's home. White females had a higher rate of suicide than African-American females, but African-American females had a higher rate of homicide than white females.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence, circumstances, and methods of fatal violence differ greatly between females and males. These differences should be taken into account in the development of violence prevention efforts.

PMID:
17170164
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2563482
Free PMC Article

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