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Biol Lett. 2006 Sep 22;2(3):397-400.

Seed size variability: from carob to carats.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Environmental Sciences, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zürich 8057, Switzerland. lindsayt@uwinst.unizh.ch

Abstract

The seeds of various plants were used as weights because their mass reputedly varies so little. Carob (Ceratonia siliqua), which has given its name to the carat, is particularly famous in this regard. But are carob seeds unusually constant in weight and, if not, how did the myth arise? The variability of seeds sampled from a collection of carob trees (CV=23%) was close to the average of 63 species reviewed from the literature (CV=25%). However, in a perception experiment observers could discriminate differences in carob seed weight of around 5% by eye demonstrating the potential for humans to greatly reduce natural variation. Interestingly, the variability of pre-metrication carat weight standards is also around 5% suggesting that human rather than natural selection gave rise to the carob myth.

PMID:
17148413
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1686184
Free PMC Article

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