Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care. 2007 Jan;10(1):40-5.

Dietary protein, endurance exercise, and human skeletal-muscle protein turnover.

Author information

  • 1Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA. nancy.rodriguez@uconn.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Whereas diet and exercise have been shown to influence whole-body protein utilization, little is known about the impact of these factors on skeletal-muscle protein turnover. We highlight the role of dietary protein in modulating skeletal-muscle protein turnover in response to endurance exercise. Effects of endurance exercise on skeletal-muscle protein metabolism are presented and the influence of habitual protein intake on exercise-related protein responses is discussed.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Skeletal-muscle protein turnover increases in response to endurance exercise training and following a single endurance exercise bout. Nutritional supplementation postexercise favorably affects skeletal-muscle protein synthesis and demonstrates amino acid availability as pivotal to the skeletal-muscle synthetic response following exercise. The level of habitual protein intake influences postexercise skeletal-muscle protein turnover.

SUMMARY:

Dietary protein and exercise are powerful stimuli affecting protein turnover. Since variation in habitual protein intake influences skeletal-muscle protein turnover postexercise, investigations are needed to determine what role protein intake has in regulating skeletal-muscle protein metabolism. Long-term, well controlled diet and exercise intervention studies are essential for clarification of the relation between protein intake, endurance exercise, and skeletal-muscle protein turnover. Studies designed to characterize this relationship should be attentive to habitual macronutrient and energy intakes.

PMID:
17143053
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk