Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Schizophr Res. 2007 Feb;90(1-3):316-24. Epub 2006 Dec 1.

Social cognition in schizophrenia: relationships with neurocognition and negative symptoms.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, California State University at Northridge, Northridge, CA 91330-8255, USA. mark.sergi@csun.edu

Abstract

Despite the growing importance of social cognition in schizophrenia, fundamental issues concerning the nature of social cognition in schizophrenia remain unanswered. One issue concerns the strength of the relationships between social cognition and key features of the disorder such as neurocognitive deficits and negative symptoms. The current study employed structural equation modeling to examine three key questions regarding the nature of social cognition in schizophrenia: 1) Are social cognition and neurocognition in schizophrenia better modeled as one or two separate constructs? 2) Are social cognition and negative symptoms in schizophrenia better modeled as one or two separate constructs?, and 3) When social cognition, neurocognition, and negative symptoms are included in a single model, is social cognition more closely related to neurocognition or to negative symptoms? In this cross sectional study, one hundred outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were administered measures of social cognition, neurocognition, and negative symptoms. A two-factor model that represented social cognition and neurocognition as separate constructs fit the data significantly better than a one-factor model, suggesting that social cognition and neurocognition are distinct, yet highly related, constructs. Likewise, a two-factor model that represented social cognition and negative symptoms as separate constructs fit the data significantly better than a one-factor model, suggesting that social cognition and negative symptoms are distinct constructs. A three-factor model revealed that the relationship between social cognition and neurocognition was stronger than the relationship between social cognition and negative symptoms. The current findings start to provide insights into the structure of social cognition, neurocognition, and negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk