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Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Sep;65(4):331-40.

Traditional and market food access in Arctic Canada is affected by economic factors.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment (CINE), McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to evaluate the access that Indigenous women have to traditional and market foods in 44 communities across Arctic Canada.

STUDY DESIGN:

This secondary data analysis used a cross-sectional survey of 1771 Yukon First Nations, Dene/M├ętis and Inuit women stratified by age.

METHODS:

Socio-cultural questionnaires were used to investigate food access and chi-square testing was used to ascertain the distribution of subject responses by age and region.

RESULTS:

There was considerable regional variation in the ability to afford adequate food, with between 40% and 70% saying they could afford enough food. Similarly, regional variation was reflected in the percentage of the population who could afford, or had access to, hunting or fishing equipment. Up to 50% of the responses indicated inadequate access to fishing and hunting equipment, and up to 46% of participants said they could not afford to go hunting or fishing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Affordability of market food and accessibility to hunting and fishing in Arctic Canada were major barriers to Indigenous women's food security.

PMID:
17131971
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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