Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Cancer. 2007 Feb 15;120(4):833-43.

Statins and risk of cancer: a systematic review and metaanalysis.

Author information

  • 1Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We conducted a systematic review of the association between HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) use and cancer risk. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, ISI Proceedings and BIOSIS Previews bibliographic databases, electronic trials registers and reference lists for potentially eligible randomized trials and observational studies. Thirty-eight individual studies (26 randomized trials involving 103,573 participants and 12 observational studies with 826,854 participants) were included. Median follow-up was 3.6 and 6.2 years for trials and observational studies, respectively. In metaanalyses of randomized trials, there was no evidence that statin therapy was associated with incidence of all-cancers (26 trials; pooled risk ratio = 1.00; 95% CI 0.95-1.05; I(2) = 0%) or the following site-specific cancers: breast (7 trials; risk ratio = 1.01; 0.79-1.30; I(2) = 43%), prostate (4 trials; risk ratio = 1.00; 0.85-1.17; I(2) = 0%), colorectum (9 trials; risk ratio = 1.02; 0.89-1.16; I(2) = 0%), lung (9 trials; risk ratio = 0.96; 0.84-1.09; I(2) = 0%), genito-urinary (5 trials; risk ratio = 0.95; 0.83-1.09; I(2) = 0%), melanoma (4 trials; risk ratio = 0.86; 0.62-1.20; I(2) = 17%) or gastric (1 trial; risk ratio = 1.00; 0.35-2.85). There was no evidence of differential effects by length of follow-up, statin type (lipophilic vs. lipophobic) or potency. Trial results were generally consistent with observational studies. We conclude that statin use is not associated with short-term cancer risk, but longer-latency effects remain possible.

PMID:
17131313
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Icon for PubMed Health
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk