Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Am Diet Assoc. 2006 Dec;106(12):1992-2000.

Beverage consumption in the US population.

Author information

  • 1Center for Food, Nutrition, and Agriculture Policy, University of Maryland, College Park, 1122 Patapsco, College Park, MD 20742, USA. storey@umd.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to examine beverage consumption across age, sex, and race/ethnicity categories using the most current data available, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002.

DESIGN:

Beverage consumption that included fluid milk, fruit juices, regular and diet carbonated soft drinks, regular and diet fruit drinks/ades, coffee, and tea was examined among white, African-American, and Mexican-American persons in age groups 6 to 11 years, 12 to 19 years, 20 to 39 years, 40 to 59 years, and >60 years. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002 were used in this study.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS:

Group means were estimated for the age group, sex, and race/ethnicity subgroups. The probability that any of these group means were equal to one another was tested using statistical software.

RESULTS:

The data showed marked differences in beverage consumption depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. In general, males consumed more beverages than did females. Specifically, white and Mexican-American persons of all ages consumed more milk than did African-American persons. On average, African-American males and females of all ages consumed significantly more fruit drinks/ades than did other race/ethnicity groups. In contrast, white persons consumed more carbonated soft drinks than did other race/ethnicity groups.

CONCLUSION:

Average beverage consumption varied depending on age, sex, and race/ethnicity. Knowledge of differences in beverage consumption patterns is important for food and nutrition professionals and nutrition policymakers. Better understanding of the many factors that influence beverage consumption levels is needed.

PMID:
17126630
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk