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Brain Inj. 2006 Oct;20(11):1155-62.

Masculine role adherence and outcomes among men with traumatic brain injury.

Author information

  • 1Department of Health Psychology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65212, USA. schoppl@health.missouri.edu

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant health problem disproportionately affecting men and is often associated with changes in masculine role functioning in life domains such as vocational functioning, sexual and inter-personal functioning and personal independence. These changes could have serious implications for men's adjustment following injury. The aim of this study was to examine the relations among traditional masculine role adherence, psychosocial adjustment and rehabilitation outcomes in men with TBI.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

A correlational design was chosen to examine the relations among variables. Spearman correlations and Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests were used to examine relationships between masculine role variables and outcome variables.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

The study included 33 men with TBI who had been discharged from inpatient rehabilitation within 5 years. Participants completed surveys on traditional masculine gender role adherence and gender role conflict and additional data, including measures of functional outcome, life satisfaction, psychosocial outcomes and earnings, were obtained through the TBI Model System longitudinal data collection system.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

The results revealed significant associations between masculine role adherence and satisfaction with life, follow-up earnings and FIM change from admission to discharge.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the current study, particular masculine role variables corresponded to different functional and psychological outcomes. Understanding these differences provides new directions for treatment and offers important information about aspects of traditional masculine roles that may enhance or hinder adjustment to injury.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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