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Appetite. 2007 May;48(3):397-401. Epub 2006 Nov 21.

Short-term effects of chewing gum on snack intake and appetite.

Author information

  • 1Department of Psychology, Glasgow Caledonian University, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow G4 0BA, UK. Marion.Hetherington@gcal.ac.uk

Abstract

Consumers report that chewing gum can reduce cravings and the likelihood of snacking. The present study set out to examine the effects of chewing gum on subjective appetite and snack energy intake (EI) in 60 participants (40 females, 20 males, 21.7+/-4 years; BMI=22.7+/-3.4) who came to the laboratory four times for lunch and then returned 3 h later for a snack. Participants consumed salty or sweet snacks after chewing gum (sugar-free or regular) for 15 min hourly after lunch or had no-gum. Hunger, desire to eat and fullness were rated immediately after lunch (T0) and hourly post-lunch (T1 and T2) until just before snack (T3). Chewing gum reduced EI by 36 cal (401.8+/-22 kcal) compared to no-gum (437.7+/-23 kcal; p=0.04). Rated hunger increased from T0 to T3 (p<0.001); however, this was less after gum compared to no-gum (p<0.01). Desire to consume salty and sweet snacks also increased. However, desire to eat sweet snacks (but not salty) increased less after gum compared to no-gum (p=0.004). Therefore, chewing gum suppressed appetite, specifically desire for sweets and reduced snack intake. This supports anecdotal reports by consumers and could inform weight control strategies.

PMID:
17118491
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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