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Pediatrics. 2006 Dec;118(6):e1845-59. Epub 2006 Nov 20.

Impact of prenatal chlorpyrifos exposure on neurodevelopment in the first 3 years of life among inner-city children.

Author information

  • 1Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, 60 Haven Ave, B-109, New York, NY 10032, USA. var1@columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos on 3-year neurodevelopment and behavior in a sample of inner-city minority children.

METHODS:

As part of an ongoing prospective cohort study in an inner-city minority population, neurotoxicant effects of prenatal exposure to chlorpyrifos were evaluated in 254 children through the first 3 years of life. This report examined cognitive and motor development at 12, 24, and 36 months (measured with the Bayley Scales of Infant Development II) and child behavior at 36 months (measured with the Child Behavior Checklist) as a function of chlorpyrifos levels in umbilical cord plasma.

RESULTS:

Highly exposed children (chlorpyrifos levels of >6.17 pg/g plasma) scored, on average, 6.5 points lower on the Bayley Psychomotor Development Index and 3.3 points lower on the Bayley Mental Development Index at 3 years of age compared with those with lower levels of exposure. Children exposed to higher, compared with lower, chlorpyrifos levels were also significantly more likely to experience Psychomotor Development Index and Mental Development Index delays, attention problems, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder problems, and pervasive developmental disorder problems at 3 years of age.

CONCLUSIONS:

The adjusted mean 36-month Psychomotor Development Index and Mental Development Index scores of the highly and lower exposed groups differed by only 7.1 and 3.0 points, respectively, but the proportion of delayed children in the high-exposure group, compared with the low-exposure group, was 5 times greater for the Psychomotor Development Index and 2.4 times greater for the Mental Development Index, increasing the number of children possibly needing early intervention services.

Comment in

PMID:
17116700
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC3390915
Free PMC Article

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