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Support Care Cancer. 2007 May;15(5):497-503. Epub 2006 Nov 14.

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: incidence and impact on patient quality of life at community oncology settings.

Author information

  • 1Department of Behavioral Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. lcohen@mdanderson.org

Abstract

GOALS OF WORK:

The present study sought to determine the prevalence of acute and delayed chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) across ten community oncology settings. The effect of CINV on quality of life (QOL) was also evaluated.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Cancer patients who were scheduled for their first cycle of a new chemotherapy regimen were recruited from ten community oncology clinics. Study participants recorded occurrence of CINV by completing a daily diary each day for the first 8 days after treatment during each cycle and the Functional Living Index-Emesis (FLIE) before chemotherapy, at the end of day 1 and day 6 after chemotherapy. Mixed model regression analysis was used to explore the association between occurrence of CINV at cycle 1 and subsequent cycles and its impact on patient QOL.

MAIN RESULTS:

One hundred and fifty-one patients provided information for at least one cycle. During cycle 1, only 33% had neither acute nor delayed CINV. Of the 36% patients who developed acute CINV, 8% developed acute CINV only. Of the 59% who developed delayed CINV, 53% reported delayed only and 47% reported acute and delayed CINV. A similar pattern was seen at cycles 2 and 3. Experience of CINV at cycle 1 was associated with the development of CINV at cycles 2 and 3. Occurrence of CINV significantly interfered with patient QOL as assessed by the FLIE.

CONCLUSIONS:

CINV remained a substantial problem for patients receiving chemotherapy in this community-based sample, especially delayed CINV. CINV significantly interfered with patient QOL and daily functioning.

PMID:
17103197
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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