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N Engl J Med. 2006 Nov 16;355(20):2113-24. Epub 2006 Nov 13.

Treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis with a paclitaxel-coated balloon catheter.

Author information

  • 1Universit√§tsklinikum des Saarlandes, Homburg/Saar, Germany. bruno.scheller@uniklinikum-saarland.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis is hampered by a high incidence of recurrent in-stent restenosis. We assessed the efficacy and safety of a paclitaxel-coated balloon in this setting.

METHODS:

We enrolled 52 patients with in-stent restenosis in a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial to compare the effects of a balloon catheter coated with paclitaxel (3 microg per square millimeter of balloon surface area) with those of an uncoated balloon catheter in coronary angioplasty. The primary end point was late luminal loss as seen on angiography. Secondary end points included the rates of restenosis (a binary variable) and major adverse cardiac events.

RESULTS:

Multivessel disease was present in 80% of patients in both groups. Quantitative coronary angiography revealed no significant differences in baseline measures. At 6 months, angiography showed that the mean (+/-SD) in-segment late luminal loss was 0.74+/-0.86 mm in the uncoated-balloon group versus 0.03+/-0.48 mm in the coated-balloon group (P=0.002). A total of 10 of 23 patients (43%) in the uncoated-balloon group had restenosis, as compared with 1 of 22 patients (5%) in the coated-balloon group (P=0.002). At 12 months, the rate of major adverse cardiac events was 31% in the uncoated-balloon group and 4% in the coated-balloon group (P=0.01). This difference was primarily due to the need for target-lesion revascularization in six patients in the uncoated-balloon group (P=0.02).

CONCLUSIONS:

Treatment of coronary in-stent restenosis with paclitaxel-coated balloon catheters significantly reduced the incidence of restenosis. These data suggest that the inhibition of restenosis by local drug delivery may not require stent implantation and sustained drug release at the site of injury. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00106587 [ClinicalTrials.gov].).

PMID:
17101615
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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