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Urology. 2006 Nov;68(5):1072-6. Epub 2006 Nov 7.

Association between family history of prostate and breast cancer among African-American men with prostate cancer.

Author information

  • 1Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0946, USA. jbeebe@med.umich.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To explore the familial aggregation of prostate and breast cancer using data from a population-based case-control study of African-American men participating in the Flint Men's Health Study.

METHODS:

A detailed family history questionnaire was administered to 121 African-American men with prostate cancer and 179 African-American male controls. The family history data of prostate and breast cancer in first-degree relatives were compared between men with and without prostate cancer using standard statistical methods.

RESULTS:

In the Flint Men's Health Study, men with prostate cancer were more likely than controls to report having a brother with prostate cancer (age-adjusted odds ratio 4.80, 95% confidence interval 2.01 to 11.44) or a sister with breast cancer (age-adjusted odds ratio 3.80, 95% confidence interval 1.57 to 9.22).

CONCLUSIONS:

Although a family history of prostate cancer is a recognized prostate cancer risk factor consistent across different races, few studies have examined the co-clustering of breast and prostate cancer within African-American families. Future studies should focus on racially heterogeneous populations to further explore the observation from the Flint Men's Health Study that having a brother with prostate cancer or a sister with breast cancer may be associated with prostate cancer occurrence. This research may have implications for both gene identification and early detection strategies.

PMID:
17095075
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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