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Rev Neurol (Paris). 2006 Nov;162(11):1059-67.

[Sporadic cerebral amyloidotic angiopathy].

[Article in French]

Author information

  • 1Département de Neurologie, CHU de Rouen. Luciecabrejo@hotmail.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Sporadic cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a microangiopathy identified by neuropathological examination in more than 30 percent of patients over 85 years of age.

STATE OF ART:

Boston criteria for diagnosis of CAA--related hemorrhage are as follows: "definite CAA", "Probable CAA with supporting pathology", "Probable CAA" and "Possible CAA". Clinical manifestations of CAA are either lobar, cortical, corticosubcortical or cerebellar hemorrhages associated with progressive dementia. Dementia, corresponding either to Alzheimer disease, vascular or mixed dementia, precedes hemorrhages in 25 to 40 percent of cases. Brain MRI can demonstrate microbleeding.

PERSPECTIVES:

This review compares data regarding CAA prevalence, intracranial hemorrhages, and their risk factors in old patients. Diagnosis and preventive strategies are discussed. It would be useful to identify those affected by CAA among elderly demented patients with atrial fibrillation requiring anticoagulation therapy.

CONCLUSIONS:

CAA is suspected in the presence of recurrent lobar or cerebellar hemorrhages, and moreover if associated with pre-existing dementia. In elderly demented patients, MRI criteria to detect CAA should be considered in order to prevent hemorrhage risk, particularly after anticoagulation therapy.

PMID:
17086142
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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