Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Environ Res. 2007 Jul;104(3):374-82. Epub 2006 Nov 3.

The relationships between blood lead levels and serum follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Author information

  • 1National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Robert A. Taft Laboratories, MS C-22, Cincinnati, OH 45226, USA. erk3@cdc.gov

Abstract

The relationships between blood lead levels and serum follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were assessed in a nationally representative sample of women, 35-60 years old, from the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The blood lead levels of the women ranged from 0.7 to 31.1 microg/dl. The estimated geometric mean was 2.2 microg/dl, and the estimated arithmetic mean was 2.8 microg/dl. As the blood lead level increased across women, the concentration of serum follicle stimulating hormone increased in post-menopausal women, women who had both ovaries removed, and pre-menopausal women. The concentration of follicle stimulating hormone decreased in pre-menopausal women who were taking birth control pills. The concentration of luteinizing hormone increased as blood lead level increased in post-menopausal women and women who had both ovaries removed. The lowest concentrations of blood lead at which a relationship was detected were 1.7 microg/dl for follicle stimulating hormone and 2.8 microg/dl for luteinizing hormone. The increase in follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone in women with no ovaries indicates that lead may act at a non-ovarian site in the female reproductive system, along with a possible effect on the ovaries.

PMID:
17084837
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk