Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Injury. 2007 Jan;38(1):27-33. Epub 2006 Oct 31.

A review of traumatic airway injuries: potential implications for airway assessment and management.

Author information

  • 1carmen.kummer@sunnybrook.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obtaining a patent airway can be difficult in patients with traumatic airway injuries (TAI). There is a paucity of data available about the incidence of airway compromise and techniques used in these patients.

METHODS:

Charts review of all patients with TAI treated in a Regional Trauma Center from July 1989 to June 2005.

RESULTS:

One hundred and four patients were identified as TAI in the study period (incidence of 0.4% for blunt and 4.5% for penetrating trauma). Sixty-eighty patients were victims of penetrating trauma (ISS: 24+/-10; mortality: 16%). Thirty-six patients were blunt trauma victims (ISS: 33+/-16; mortality: 36%). Overall, 65% of the patients received a definitive airway (DA) in the pre-hospital setting or at the initial hospital assessment. Alternative techniques for obtaining DA including wound tracheal tube, surgical airway and intubation under fiberoptic bronchoscopy were used in 30% of the patients. Among 24 deaths, 10 were considered primarily due to the airway injury. Twelve patients presented with thoracic TAI with nine deaths in this subgroup.

CONCLUSIONS:

Overall, the incidence of TAI is low. Blunt trauma TAI is less common, and these patients have a different clinical presentation, higher ISS and mortality than the penetrating TAI group. Early assessment of airways is crucial and DA was required in 2/3 of the patients with TAI. Lower airway injuries have higher mortality than upper airway injuries. Even though most patients died as a result of other injuries, causative factors of death included difficulty in obtaining DA and ventilation/oxygenation problems.

PMID:
17078954
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk