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Fertil Steril. 2006 Dec;86(6):1561-72. Epub 2006 Oct 23.

Economic burden of endometriosis.

Author information

  • 1Health Economic Research and Quality of Life Evaluation Services, Abt Associates, Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20814-5341, USA. cindy_gao@abtassoc.com <cindy_gao@abtassoc.com>

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To comprehensively review and evaluate the direct costs of endometriosis.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

We systematically reviewed studies published since 1990, and conducted an analysis of publicly available national databases (Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey/National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey) in the United States. We assessed: [1] the overall economic impact of endometriosis; [2] the direct costs associated with specific treatments; and [3] the indirect costs of endometriosis associated with reduced work productivity.

RESULTS:

Of 13 published studies meeting inclusion criteria, 11 (85%) addressed direct costs, a few studies addressed outpatient costs or indirect costs, and no study quantified the economic impact among adolescents. Direct endometriosis-related costs were considerable and appeared driven by hospitalizations. Our database analysis found: [1] as endometriosis-related hospital length of stay steadily declined from 1993 to 2002, per-patient cost increased 61%; [2] adolescents (aged 10-17 years) had endometriosis-related hospitalizations; [3] approximately 50% of >600,000 endometriosis-related ambulatory patient visits involved specialist care; and [4] females 23 years old or younger constituted >20% of endometriosis-related outpatient visits.

CONCLUSIONS:

Health economic information for endometriosis is scarce, limiting our understanding of its overall economic impact. Nevertheless, the literature and other available data suggest that endometriosis places a considerable burden on patients and society.

PMID:
17056043
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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