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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2006 Oct 31;103(44):16147-52. Epub 2006 Oct 19.

Functional reconstitution and characterization of Pyrococcus furiosus RNase P.

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  • 1Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Graduate Program, Ohio State Biochemistry Program, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Abstract

RNase P, which catalyzes the magnesium-dependent 5'-end maturation of tRNAs in all three domains of life, is composed of one essential RNA and a varying number of protein subunits depending on the source: at least one in bacteria, four in archaea, and nine in eukarya. To address why multiple protein subunits are needed for archaeal/eukaryal RNase P catalysis, in contrast to their bacterial relative, in vitro reconstitution of these holoenzymes is a prerequisite. Using recombinant subunits, we have reconstituted in vitro the RNase P holoenzyme from the thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu) and furthered our understanding regarding its functional organization and assembly pathway(s). Whereas Pfu RNase P RNA (RPR) alone is capable of multiple turnover, addition of all four RNase P protein (Rpp) subunits to Pfu RPR results in a 25-fold increase in its k(cat) and a 170-fold decrease in K(m). In fact, even in the presence of only one of two specific pairs of Rpps, the RPR displays activity at lower substrate and magnesium concentrations. Moreover, a pared-down, mini-Pfu RNase P was identified with an RPR deletion mutant. Results from our kinetic and footprinting studies on Pfu RNase P, together with insights from recent structures of bacterial RPRs, provide a framework for appreciating the role of multiple Rpps in archaeal RNase P.

PMID:
17053064
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1637551
Free PMC Article

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