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Blood. 2007 Feb 1;109(3):1331-3. Epub 2006 Oct 5.

Evidence for an immune barrier after in utero hematopoietic-cell transplantation.

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  • 1Center for Fetal Research, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

The competence of the immune system of the developing fetus to act as a barrier to in utero hematopoietic-cell transplantation (IUHCT) has been a source of debate. Until now, comparisons of allogeneic and congenic engraftment have been inconclusive due to methodologic limitations resulting in minimal and inefficient engraftment. In this study, E14 fetal mice received transplants of either allogeneic or congenic bone marrow using a new intravascular technique that allows definitive administration of much higher doses of donor cells. Our results demonstrate that 100% of surviving recipients demonstrate engraftment at 1 week of age, but that 70% of allogeneic recipients lose engraftment by 1 month of age, and 80% ultimately fail to sustain long-term chimerism. In contrast, all congenic recipients maintain stable, long-term, multilineage chimerism. These results strongly support an immune barrier to allogeneic engraftment after IUHCT.

PMID:
17023584
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1785153
Free PMC Article

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