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J Pediatr. 2006 Oct;149(4):452-60.

Risk factors for intussusception in infants in Vietnam and Australia: adenovirus implicated, but not rotavirus.

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  • 1Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition, Emergency Medicine, Microbiology, Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Australia. julie.bines@rch.org.au

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to investigate risk factors for the development of intussusception in infants in a developing country with a suspected high incidence and in a developed country with a low incidence.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective case-control study of infants <2 years of age with idiopathic intussusception confirmed by air enema or surgery was conducted at the National Hospital of Paediatrics (NHP), Vietnam (n = 533) and the Royal Children's Hospital (RCH), Australia (n = 51). Diagnosis was validated in a subset (84% NHP; 67% RCH) by an independent blinded radiologist. Risk factor assessment was performed using a standardized questionnaire. Stool specimens were assayed for bacterial, viral, and parasitic agents.

RESULTS:

The incidence of intussusception in Vietnam was 302/100,000 in infants <1 year of age (95% CI: 258-352), substantially higher than in Australia (71/100,000). A strong association with adenovirus infection was observed at both sites (cases positive at NHP: 34%, OR 8.2; cases positive at RCH: 40%, OR 44). No association was identified between intussusception and rotavirus, other enteric pathogens, oral polio vaccine, feeding practices, or living conditions.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of intussusception in infants was markedly higher in Vietnam than in Australia. A strong association between adenovirus infection and intussusception was identified at both sites suggesting that adenovirus may play a role in the etiology of intussusception.

Comment in

PMID:
17011313
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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