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Clin Exp Pharmacol Physiol. 2006 Oct;33(10):980-8.

Renal parenchymal oxygenation and hypoxia adaptation in acute kidney injury.

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  • 1Nephrology and Critical Care, Virchow Charitè University Clinic, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI), formally termed acute tubular necrosis, is complex and, phenotypically, may range from functional dysregulation without overt morphological features to literal tubular destruction. Hypoxia results from imbalanced oxygen supply and consumption. Increasing evidence supports the view that regional renal hypoxia occurs in AKI irrespective of the underlying condition, even under circumstances basically believed to reflect 'direct' tubulotoxicity. However, at present, it is remains unclear whether hypoxia per se or, rather, re-oxygenation (possibly through reactive oxygen species) causes AKI. Data regarding renal hypoxia in the clinical situation of AKI are lacking and our current concepts regarding renal oxygenation during acute renal failure are presumptive and largely derived from experimental studies. There is robust experimental evidence that AKI is often associated with altered intrarenal microcirculation and oxygenation. Furthermore, renal parenchymal oxygen deprivation seems to participate in the pathogenesis of experimental AKI, induced by exogenous nephrotoxins (such as contrast media, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or amphotericin), sepsis, pigment and obstructive nephropathies. Sub-lethal cellular hypoxia engenders adaptational responses through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Forthcoming technologies to modulate the HIF system form a novel potential therapeutic approach for AKI.

PMID:
17002677
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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