Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nat Med. 2006 Oct;12(10):1160-6. Epub 2006 Sep 24.

Monoculture-derived T lymphocytes specific for multiple viruses expand and produce clinically relevant effects in immunocompromised individuals.

Author information

  • 1Center for Cell and Gene Therapy, Baylor College of Medicine, The Methodist Hospital and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Abstract

Immunocompromised individuals are at high risk for life-threatening diseases, especially those caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and adenovirus. Conventional therapeutics are primarily active only against CMV, and resistance is frequent. Adoptive transfer of polyclonal cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) specific for CMV or EBV seems promising, but it is unclear whether this strategy can be extended to adenovirus, which comprises many serotypes. In addition, the preparation of a specific CTL line for each virus in every eligible individual would be impractical. Here we describe genetic modification of antigen-presenting cell lines to facilitate the production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes specific for CMV, EBV and several serotypes of adenovirus from a single cell culture. When administered to immunocompromised individuals, the single T lymphocyte line expands into multiple discrete virus-specific populations that supply clinically measurable antiviral activity. Monoculture-derived multispecific CTL infusion could provide a safe and efficient means to restore virus-specific immunity in the immunocompromised host.

PMID:
16998485
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Nature Publishing Group
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk