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Maturitas. 2007 Feb 20;56(2):198-204. Epub 2006 Sep 18.

Feasibility and acceptability of restorative yoga for treatment of hot flushes: a pilot trial.

Author information

  • 1General Internal Medicine Section, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, CA 94121-1598, USA. Beth.Cohen@ucsf.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the feasibility and acceptability of a restorative yoga intervention for the treatment of hot flushes in postmenopausal women.

METHODS:

A pilot trial in 14 postmenopausal women experiencing > or =4 moderate to severe hot flushes per day or > or =30 moderate to severe hot flushes per week. The intervention consisted of eight restorative yoga poses taught in a 3-h introductory session and 8 weekly 90-min sessions. Feasibility was measured by recruitment rates, subject retention and adherence. Acceptability was assessed by subject interview and questionnaires. Efficacy measures included change in frequency and severity of hot flushes as recorded on a 7-day diary.

RESULTS:

Recruitment was accomplished as planned. The majority of study subjects (93%) completed the trial. Of those who completed the trial, 92% attended seven or more of the eight yoga sessions. The majority of the subjects were satisfied with the study and 75% continued to practice yoga 3 months after the study. Mean number of hot flushes per week decreased by 30.8% (95% CI 15.6-45.9%) and mean hot flush score decreased 34.2% (95% CI 16.0-52.5%) from baseline to week 8. No adverse events were observed.

CONCLUSIONS:

This pilot trial demonstrates that it is feasible to teach restorative yoga to middle-aged women without prior yoga experience. The high rates of subject retention and satisfaction suggest that yoga is an acceptable intervention in this population. Our results indicate that a larger, randomized controlled trial to explore the efficacy of restorative yoga for treatment of menopausal symptoms would be safe and feasible.

PMID:
16979311
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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