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JAMA. 2006 Sep 6;296(9):1079-85.

Effectiveness of University of California postbaccalaureate premedical programs in increasing medical school matriculation for minority and disadvantaged students.

Author information

  • 1Center for California Health Workforce Studies, Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of California, San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA 94110, USA. kgrumbach@fcm.ucsf.edu

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Many medical schools administer postbaccalaureate premedical programs targeting underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students, with the goal of increasing the number of these students matriculating into medical school.

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether University of California (UC) postbaccalaureate programs are effective in increasing medical school matriculation rates for program participants.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS:

Retrospective cohort study assessing 5 UC medical school postbaccalaureate programs. The cohort comprised 265 participants in the postbaccalaureate programs in the 1999 through 2002 academic years and a control group of 396 college graduates who applied to the programs but did not participate. Of the participants, 66% were underrepresented minorities, and for 50% neither parent had attended college.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Matriculation by 2005 into a US medical school accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

RESULTS:

By 2005, 67.6% of participants and 22.5% of controls had matriculated into medical school (P<.001). After adjusting for baseline student characteristics, students who participated in postbaccalaureate programs had a higher probability of matriculating into medical school in a regression model controlling for grade point average and demographic characteristics (odds ratio, 6.30; 95% confidence interval, 4.08-9.72) and in a model further controlling for preparticipation Medical College Admissions Test score (odds ratio, 8.06; 95% confidence interval, 4.65-13.97).

CONCLUSION:

Postbaccalaureate premedical programs appear to be an effective intervention to increase the number of medical school matriculants from disadvantaged and underrepresented groups.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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