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Fertil Steril. 2006 Sep;86(3):516-23.

Declining estimates of infertility in the United States: 1982-2002.

Author information

  • 1School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057, USA. stepheel@georgetown.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine if the decline in infertility has been uniform across subgroups.

DESIGN:

Periodic data from the National Fertility Survey and the National Survey of Family Growth were used to determine which factors contributed to the decline in 12-month infertility in the United States.

SETTING:

National Survey of Family Growth, a periodic US nationally representative study.

PATIENT(S):

A nationally representative sample of married women aged 15-44 years, N = 15,303 for pooled data across 4 survey years.

INTERVENTION(S):

None.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Estimates of infertility prevalence among married women aged 15-44 years.

RESULT(S):

The decline in 12-month infertility in the United States from 8.5% in 1982 and 7.4% in 2002 was significant. This decline was evident in nearly all subgroups of married women. In the multivariate analysis, 12-month infertility was more likely among women who were older and nulliparous, were non-Hispanic black or Hispanic, and did not have a college degree. The decline in 12-month infertility was observed even after controlling for the compositional differences of the population over time.

CONCLUSION(S):

Among married women in the United States, there has been a significant decline in 12-month infertility, which cannot be explained by changes in the composition of the population from 1982-2002.

Comment in

PMID:
16952500
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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