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PLoS Comput Biol. 2006 Sep 1;2(9):e115. Epub 2006 Jul 20.

Striking similarities in the genomic distribution of tandemly arrayed genes in Arabidopsis and rice.

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  • 1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California, United States of America.

Abstract

In Arabidopsis, tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs) comprise >10% of the genes in the genome. These duplicated genes represent a rich template for genetic innovation, but little is known of the evolutionary forces governing their generation and maintenance. Here we compare the organization and evolution of TAGs between Arabidopsis and rice, two plant genomes that diverged ~150 million years ago. TAGs from the two genomes are similar in a number of respects, including the proportion of genes that are tandemly arrayed, the number of genes within an array, the number of tandem arrays, and the dearth of TAGs relative to single copy genes in centromeric regions. Analysis of recombination rates along rice chromosomes confirms a positive correlation between the occurrence of TAGs and recombination rate, as found in Arabidopsis. TAGs are also biased functionally relative to duplicated, nontandemly arrayed genes. In both genomes, TAGs are enriched for genes that encode membrane proteins and function in "abiotic and biotic stress" but underrepresented for genes involved in transcription and DNA or RNA binding functions. We speculate that these observations reflect an evolutionary trend in which successful tandem duplication involves genes either at the end of biochemical pathways or in flexible steps in a pathway, for which fluctuation in copy number is unlikely to affect downstream genes. Despite differences in the age distribution of tandem arrays, the striking similarities between rice and Arabidopsis indicate similar mechanisms of TAG generation and maintenance.

PMID:
16948529
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC1557586
Free PMC Article
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