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J Proteome Res. 2006 Sep;5(9):2207-16.

Identification of the SELDI ProteinChip human serum retentate by microcapillary liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

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  • 1Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, P.O. Box B, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA.

Abstract

Surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) has been widely applied for conducting biomarker research with the goal of discovering patterns of proteins and/or peptides from biological samples that reflect disease status. Many diseases, ranging from cancers of the colon, breast, and prostate to Alzheimer's disease, have been studied through serum protein profiling using SELDI-based methods. Although the results from SELDI-based diagnostic studies have generated a great deal of excitement and skepticism alike, the basis of the molecular identities of the features that underpin the diagnostic potential of the mass spectra is still largely unexplored. A detailed investigation has been undertaken to identify the compliment of serum proteins that bind to the commonly used weak cation exchange (WCX-2) SELDI protein chip. Following incubation and washing of a standard serum sample on the WCX-2 sorbent, proteins were harvested, digested with trypsin, fractionated by strong cation exchange liquid chromatography (LC), and subsequently analyzed by microcapillary reversed-phase LC coupled online with an ion-trap mass spectrometer. This analysis resulted in the identification of 383 unique proteins in the WCX-2 serum retentate. Among the proteins identified, 50 (13%) are documented clinical biomarkers with 36 of these (72%) identified from multiple peptides.

PMID:
16944932
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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