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J Proteome Res. 2006 Sep;5(9):2185-93.

Transgenomic metabolic interactions in a mouse disease model: interactions of Trichinella spiralis infection with dietary Lactobacillus paracasei supplementation.

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  • 1Biological Chemistry, Biomedical Sciences Division, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College London, Sir Alexander Fleming Building, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a common multifactorial intestinal disorder for which the aetiology remains largely undefined. Here, we have used a Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis)-induced model of post-infective IBS, and the effects of probiotic bacteria on gut dysfunction have been investigated using a metabonomic strategy. A total of 44 mice were divided into four groups: an uninfected control group and three T. spiralis-infected groups, one as infected control and the two other groups subsequently treated with either Lactobacillus paracasei (L. paracasei) NCC2461 in spent culture medium (SCM) or with L. paracasei-free SCM. Plasma, jejunal wall and longitudinal myenteric muscle samples were collected at day 21 post-infection. An NMR-based metabonomic approach characterized that the plasma metabolic profile of T. spiralis-infected mice showed an increased energy metabolism (lactate, citrate, alanine), fat mobilization (acetoacetate, 3-D-hydroxybutyrate, lipoproteins) and a disruption of amino acid metabolism due to increased protein breakdown, which were related to the intestinal hypercontractility. Increased levels of taurine, creatine and glycerophosphorylcholine in the jejunal muscles were associated with the muscular hypertrophy and disrupted jejunal functions. L. paracasei treatment normalized the muscular activity and the disturbed energy metabolism as evidenced by decreased glycogenesis and elevated lipid breakdown in comparison with untreated T. spiralis-infected mice. Changes in the levels of plasma metabolites (glutamine, lysine, methionine) that might relate to a modulation of immunological responses were also observed in the presence of the probiotic treatment. The work presented here suggests that probiotics may be beneficial in patients with IBS.

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