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Mil Med. 2006 Aug;171(8):729-35.

Domestic violence in the military: women's policy preferences and beliefs concerning routine screening and mandatory reporting.

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  • 1Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 624 North Broadway, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study describes active duty military (ADM) women's beliefs and preferences concerning domestic violence (DV) policy in the military.

METHODS:

Telephone interviews were completed with 474 ADM women from all services, 119 of whom had experienced DV during their military service.

RESULTS:

A majority (57%) supported routine screening. Although 87% said the military's policy on mandatory reporting should remain the same, only 48% thought abuse should be reported to the commanding officer; abused women were significantly less likely than nonabused women to agree with this aspect of the policy. ADM women's beliefs were similar to those of women in a previously studied civilian sample, except that 73% of ADM compared to 43% of civilian women thought routine screening would increase women's risk of further abuse.

CONCLUSIONS:

ADM women recognized both advantages and disadvantages of current DV policies. More research is urgently needed about actual outcomes of screening and reporting policies.

PMID:
16933813
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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