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J Surg Res. 2006 Oct;135(2):218-25. Epub 2006 Aug 14.

Exogenous pro-angiogenic stimuli cannot prevent physiologic vessel regression.

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  • 1Department of Cell Biology, Neurobiology and Anatomy, Loyola University Medical Center, Burn and Shock Trauma Institute, Maywood, Illinois, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In healing wounds, rising levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induce a period of robust angiogenesis. The levels of pro-angiogenic factors in the wound begin to decline just before a period of vascular regression, suggesting that these mediators are necessary to sustain vessel density. The purpose of this study was to determine if the maintenance of pro-angiogenic stimuli in the wound would prevent physiological vessel regression.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

A standard subcutaneous sponge wound model was modified by the addition of a mini-osmotic pump, allowing manipulation of the wound milieu by the addition of exogenous growth factors. After initial characterization of this model, exogenous VEGF (10 microg/mL), FGF (10 microg/mL), PDGF (10 microg/mL), or VEGF (10 microg/mL) plus FGF (10 microg/mL) were delivered to wounds and blood vessel density analyzed by immunohistochemistry.

RESULTS:

VEGF administration resulted in a transient increase in wound vessel density (P < 0.05). None of the pro-angiogenic growth factors (VEGF, FGF, PDGF, VEGF/FGF) were able to prevent vascular regression (P = NS).

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest that the anti-angiogenic signals that mediate physiological vascular regression in wounds are strongly dominant over pro-angiogenic stimuli during the later phases of wound healing. Clinical manipulation of anti-angiogenic signals in addition to the currently used pro-angiogenic targets may be needed to achieve therapeutic modulation of blood vessel density.

PMID:
16904692
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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