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Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2006 Aug 18;131(33):1793-8.

[Effectiveness of inpatient pulmonary rehabilitation (AHB). Results of a multicenter prospective observation study].

[Article in German]

Author information

  • 1Fachklinik Allgäu, Pfronten. kschultz@ahg.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

The value of pulmonary rehabilitation in the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is well accepted. However, there are no data on the efficacy of in-patient rehabilitation instituted within 14 days after an acute disease episode, as practised in Germany. It was the purpose of this multi-centre prospective study to assess changes in lung function, exercise capacity, symptoms and disease-related quality of life (QoL) in patients discharged from hospital for an episode of worsening COPD or asthma, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia or treatment of lung cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

207 patients (mean age 60 13 years) with COPD (n=86), pneumonia (n=42), lung cancer (n=24), asthma (n=14), pulmonary embolism (n=7) or other pulmonary disease (n=34) were included. Measurements of lung function, exercise capacity and disease-related QoL were carried out at the beginning and end of rehabilitation. Socio-economic data and disease-related QoL measurements were recorded again after 2 months.

RESULTS:

Rehabilitation led to a significant improvement of lung function, exercise capacity and QoL. Patients felt rehabilitation was efficacious (95%), to be recommended (99%) and important (100%). Improvement of QoL was maintained at two 2 months and only 16% of previously working patients had applied for retirement.

CONCLUSIONS:

The data demonstrate the clinically relevant benefit of in-patient pulmonary rehabilitation immediately after a period of acute illness. In view of these result and the known morbidity and mortality of patients with COPD after hospitalization for a period of acute illness, this form of pulmonary rehabilitation should be considered as standard treatment for these patients.

PMID:
16902901
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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