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Pediatrics. 2006 Aug;118(2):644-50.

High-dose inhaled fluticasone does not replace oral prednisolone in children with mild to moderate acute asthma.

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  • 1Division of Paediatric Emergency Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Ave, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X8. suzanne.schuh@sickkids.on.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Inhaled corticosteroids are not as effective as oral corticosteroids in school-aged children with severe acute asthma. It is uncertain how inhaled corticosteroids compare with oral corticosteroids in mild to moderate exacerbations.

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this work was to determine whether there is a significant difference in the percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second in children with mild to moderate acute asthma treated with either inhaled fluticasone or oral prednisolone.

METHODS:

This was a randomized, double-blind controlled trial conducted between 2001 and 2004 in a tertiary care pediatric emergency department. We studied a convenience sample of 69 previously healthy children 5 to 17 years of age with acute asthma and forced expiratory volume in 1 second at 50% to 79% predicted value; 41 families refused participation. Albuterol was given in the emergency department and salmeterol was given after discharge to all patients, as well as either 2 mg of fluticasone via metered dose inhaler and valved holding chamber in the emergency department plus 500 microg twice daily via Diskus for 10 doses after discharge (fluticasone group, N = 35) or 2 mg/kg of oral prednisolone in the emergency department plus 5 daily doses of 1 mg/kg of prednisolone after discharge (prednisolone group, N = 34). We measured a priori defined absolute change in percent predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second from baseline to 4 and 48 hours in the 2 groups. RESULTS. At 240 minutes, the forced expiratory volume in 1 second increased by 19.1% +/- 12.7% in the fluticasone group and 29.8% +/- 15.5% in the prednisolone group. At 48 hours, this difference was no longer significant (estimated difference: 4.0 +/- 3.4; P = .14). The relapse rates by 48 hours were 12.5% and 0% in the fluticasone group and prednisolone group, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Airway obstruction in children with mild to moderate acute asthma in the emergency department improves faster on oral than inhaled corticosteroids.

PMID:
16882819
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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