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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2006 Aug 1;229(3):370-5.

Association between various physical factors and acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion in Dachshunds.

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  • 1Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether body weight, body condition score, or various body dimensions were associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion and whether any of these factors were associated with severity of clinical signs in Dachshunds.

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional clinical study.

ANIMALS:

75 Dachshunds with (n = 39) or without (36) acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion.

PROCEDURES:

Signalment, various body measurements, body weight, body condition score, and spinal cord injury grade were recorded at the time of initial examination.

RESULTS:

Mean T1-S1 distance and median tuber calcaneus-to-patellar tendon (TC-PT) distance were significantly shorter in affected than in unaffected dogs. A 1-cm decrease in T1-S1 distance was associated with a 2.1-times greater odds of being affected, and a 1-cm decrease in TC-PT distance was associated with an 11.1-times greater odds of being affected. Results of multivariable logistic regression also indicated that affected dogs were taller at the withers and had a larger pelvic circumference than unaffected dogs, after adjusting for other body measurements. Results of ordinal logistic regression indicated that longer T1-S1 distance, taller height at the withers, and smaller pelvic circumference were associated with more severe spinal cord injury.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Results suggest that certain body dimensions may be associated with acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion or protrusion in Dachshunds and, in affected dogs, with severity of neurologic dysfunction.

PMID:
16881827
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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