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Auton Autacoid Pharmacol. 2006 Jul;26(3):253-60.

Muscarinic stimulation of the mouse isolated whole bladder: physiological responses in young and ageing mice.

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  • 1Urophysiology Research Group, School of Surgical Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.

Abstract

1 Peripheral autonomous bladder activity is an incompletely understood property that may be important both in normal bladder function and in functional problems of the lower urinary tract. We describe how a muscarinic agonist, arecaidine, influences intravesical pressure and intramural bladder contractions in the isolated mouse and how response varies in ageing mice. 2 A group of 12 mice aged 3-4 months was compared with an 'ageing' group of 12 mice age 28-34 months. Bladders were microsurgically removed and mounted in whole organ tissue baths. The effects of the muscarinic agonist arecaidine on intravesical pressure and intramural contractions were performed at different bladder volumes. 3 In normal mice, arecaidine elicited tonic and phasic contractions, the latter showing a more substantial increase in amplitude with bladder distension. Localized 'micromotion' contractions were seen in the bladder wall, with regional differences arising after exposure to arecaidine. A background release of acetylcholine was inferred from the pressure increase induced by the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. 4 Both micromotion activity and the phasic component of the arecaidine response were substantially reduced in ageing mice; the tonic component was preserved in the same specimens. 5 We conclude that the enhanced pressure fluctuations seen at high bladder volumes may act as a peripheral determinant of bladder capacity, and that changes in such activity may contribute to altered functional capacity and lower urinary tract symptoms in ageing individuals.

PMID:
16879490
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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