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Intensive Care Med. 2006 Oct;32(10):1606-12. Epub 2006 Jul 28.

Intracranial pressure complicating severe traumatic brain injury in children: monitoring and management.

Author information

  • 1Diana Princess of Wales Children's Hospital, Steelhouse Lane, B4 6NH, Birmingham, UK. kevin.morris@bch.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify factors associated with the use of intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and to establish which ICP-targetted therapies are being used in children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the United Kingdom. To evaluate current practice against recently published guidelines.

DESIGN AND SETTING:

Prospective data collection of clinical and demographic information from paediatric and adult intensive care units in the UK and Ireland admitting children (< 16 years) with TBI between February 2001 and August 2003.

RESULTS:

Detailed clinical information was obtained for 501 children, with information on the use of ICP monitoring available in 445. ICP monitoring was used in only 59% (75/127) of children presenting with an emergency room Glasgow Coma Scale of 8 or below. Large between centre variation was seen in the use of ICP monitoring, independent of severity of injury. There were 86 children who received ICP-targetted therapies without ICP monitoring. Wide between centre variation was found in the use of ICP-targetted therapies and in general aspects of management, such as fluid restriction, the use of muscle relaxants and prophylactic anticonvulsants. Intra-ventricular catheters are rarely placed (6% of cases); therefore cerebrospinal fluid drainage is seldom used as a first-line therapy for raised ICP. Jugular venous bulb oximetry (4%), brain microdialysis (< 1%) and brain tissue oxygen monitoring (< 1%) are rarely used in current practice. Contrary to published guidelines, moderate to severe hyperventilation is being used without monitoring for cerebral ischaemia.

CONCLUSIONS:

There is an urgent need for greater standardisation of practice across UK centres admitting children with severe TBI.

Comment in

PMID:
16874495
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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